Cultivate yourself: the biopic of Gladys Marín



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Bye! We are fully entering the World Cup and this weekend we will know who will meet in the quarter-finals. It will be two scary weeks.

  • The In-Edit festival also starts next week, precisely next Wednesday. The opening film at the Nescafé Theater of the Arts will be a highly anticipated documentary about Sinéad O’Connor, Nothing compares, about the life and career of the legendary artist. Another tape that promises is Meet me in the bathroomwhich is about the 2000s indie rock scene, with stories from bands like The Strokes and the Yeah Yeah Yeahs.

  • In this edition: the participation of Pedro Almodóvar in an act against the censorship of a play in Madrid, the first holographic simulation of a wormholesthanks to a quantum computer, and the 80th anniversary of the birth of Jimi Hendrix.

Please note that this is an abridged version of the newsletter that goes out on Fridays. So before we start a new opportunity to be part of the community cultivate yourself and here we invite you to sign up for free . I promise you we won’t spam. And if you like what I do, please share the newsletter with your friends, colleagues and family. Let’s begin!

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1- THE BIOPIC ABOUT GLADYS MARÍN

According to Advance, a series about the mythical communist leader Gladys Marín is on the way Variety this week.

  • The project is called Gladys and will be in charge of director Dominga Sotomayor (1985), winner at Locarno as best director for late to die young, who will also take care of the screenplay. The production is curated by Nicolás Acuña (The replacement).

  • The series will have ten chapters and will portray the life of Marínmarked by the disappearance of her husband Jorge Muñoz, by her clandestine life in Chile during the dictatorship and by the unprecedented lawsuit brought against the former dictator Augusto Pinochet for the crimes of his government.

  • An interesting biography about Marín has also just appeared, Glady’s smile (Planet), by writer and journalist Richard Sandoval.

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2- VANDAL OR VISITOR? MUSEUMS TRY TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE

The newspaper New York Times published an interesting article on the challenges in front of museums in view of the attacks on works of art by some environmentalists.

  • The NYT cited the case of Hans-Peter Wipplinger, the director of the Leopold Museum in Vienna, which includes famous paintings by Gustav Klimt and Egon Schiele. Bags and coats were banned. The museum has hired additional guards to patrol its five floors. It was useless, maybe there was an attack.

  • In a statement signed this month by the heads of more than 90 of the world’s largest arts institutions— including Daniel Weiss, director general of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and Glenn Lowry of the Museum of Modern Art, both based in New York — museum trustees said they were “deeply disturbed” by the “risk of damage” to the that the protesters submit to the works of art. The activists “seriously underestimate the fragility of these irreplaceable objects,” the statement added.

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3- ALMODÓVAR AGAINST THE ACT OF CENSORSHIP IN MADRID

The newspaper Village has published a note on an act of censorship that has shocked the Spanish cultural world.

  • It is a play entitled “I die because I don’t die”, by the playwright Paco Bezarra, a monologue focused on Santa Teresa de Jesús and which was removed from the programming of the Teatros del Canal by the Ministry of Culture of the Community of Madrid, allegedly due to “economic imbalances and artistic opportunities”. A member of the Vox party (far right), Gonzalo Babé, described the work as “harmful and grotesque”.

  • Almodóvar attended a dramatized reading of the award-winning monologue, where the artists Ana Belén and Aitana Sánchez-Gijón were present, among others.

  • “I’m here because I’m absolutely against any kind of censorship and that takes us back to the worst times. I never imagined today to intervene in an act against censorship. Forty years ago we demonstrated for this”Almodóvar said on the occasion.

  • In the discussion Bezerra had with the audience, Almodóvar again complained about the setback and recalled that when he presented his film in 1983 In the darkness, played by nuns, was not subject to any censorship. Furthermore, he encouraged Bezerra to come out as a performer on stage himself: “If you want, I’ll direct you.”

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4- A QUANTUM COMPUTER MAKES THE FIRST SIMULATION OF A WORMHOLE

Credit: NASA

A wormhole is a bridge between two regions of space-time and, although its existence has not been proven, it is compatible with the Theory of Relativity.

  • Now, scientists have observed some of its dynamics in a first holographic simulation using a quantum computer.as detailed in a study published by the journal Nature.

  • Wormholes (also known as Einstein-Rosen bridges) they were popularized in science fiction as a way to travel through space-time, but the Theory of Relativity says that nothing can pass through them.

  • However, a scenario was devised in 2017 where negative repulsive energy can keep them open long enough for something to go from one end to the other.

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5- 80 YEARS SINCE THE BIRTH OF JIMI HENDRIX

Turkish photographer Alper Yesiltas has used artificial intelligence to show what some dead celebrities, including Jimi Hendrix, might look like.

Originally from Seattle, United States, he is a member of the Club of 27, the one that includes artists who died at that age, such as Jim Morrison, Janis Joplin, Kurt Cobain and Amy Winehouse. Curiously, he died on 18 September, although he was in London.

  • Despite having only four years of professional music career, he marked an entire generation, thanks to his experiments with guitar and electronics. He created The Jimi Hendrix Experience in 1966 in England, and the Beatles loved it. He consolidated himself at the Monterrey festival the following year, where he ended up breaking his guitar on stage, and in 1969 the unforgettable Woodstock followed. In 1970, after drinking a mixture of wine and sleeping pills, he choked to death on his own vomit at the London Samarkand Hotel in Lansdowne Crescent, Notting Hill. He left behind a daughter in his home country and a son in Sweden, from two different mothers.

  • While I’m not a big fan of his, I’ve always liked one of his songs, “Hey Joe,” a classic based on an American folk song. A theme which, however, taking into account contemporary sensibilities, today would be a good candidate to be cancelled.


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And now, goodbye until next time. A new vacation is coming, do you have plans yet?

Send us your comments to our email cultura@elmostrador.cl or to our Instagram account @elmostrador_cultura

Have a nice weekend!

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